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Auditions for comedy Rapture, Blister, Burn

Is the grass always greener?

Gwen stayed at home, supported her husband and raised some children.

Bat logo final color chuckCatherine went the academic route, published several books on feminist issues, and is a speaker and teacher.

These two women went to college together, and after a reunion more than a decade later, each looks at the other’s life with envy. Looking back at turning points in their own lives, they can’t help but wonder if they could have been better off. Through a feminist theory class, their individual viewpoints clash and they begin to wonder if, just like a Disney movie, there might not be some way they could trade places.

Burien Actors Theatre (BAT) is thrilled to be casting Gina Gionfriddo’s Pulitzer finalist play Rapture, Blister, Burn. This play is a keen, clever, sharp-eared comedy with big discussions about serious topics.

Performances are at BAT in Burien from Feb. 16 through March 11 on Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Rehearsals begin Jan. 2 at BAT and will be some combination of four nights a week from Sunday through Thursday, exact days to be determined, until tech week.

The directors are Barbara Cawley and Beau M.K. Prichard.

$100 stipend provided, plus free on-site parking at BAT.

Auditions are Sunday, Sept. 17 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. and Monday, Sept. 18 from 7 to 10 p.m. Callbacks will be Wednesday, Sept. 20 from 6:30 to 10 p.m. If any of these dates is problematic for you, don’t let it stop you–please let us know. 

Auditions will be in 10-minute slots. You will be provided a monologue from the show to prepare (you do not have to be off book, but please get familiar with it) and you will be asked to deliver it, likely more than once. You should also be prepared to have a brief discussion on the subject material of the play (expect a question along the lines of “what does feminism mean to you?” or “Can one individual truly have it all?”) You should bring your resume and headshot to the audition.

Please make audition appointment:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 206-242-5180. Auditions will be held at Burien Actors Theatre, 14501 Fourth Ave S.W., Burien. For directions, go to http://burienactorstheatre.org/about-bat/visit.

Character Descriptions/Requirements

Seeking actors of all races, ethnicities, gender identities, gender expressions and physical/mental ability for all roles. Actors do not have to be the ages indicated, but must be able to convincingly portray them. 

Gwen (woman in her 40s): A housewife with two children, a toddler and an almost teenager. She maintains to-do lists for her husband so he can continue to be competent at his job, manages the household, and manages to not take it personally when her husband would rather get stoned and watch porn than spend time with her in the evenings. She wants more. With the reappearance of Catherine, she sees a way to get it. She is not put-upon, whiny, or needy.

Catherine (woman in her 40s): Could be a poster child for a career woman. She has no family ties to slow her down, and has had a continuing successful career in her chosen field for more than a decade. As the years have passed, she has wondered about what she passed up. With the reappearance of Gwen, she cannot help but wonder if there isn’t something to all that she has missed. She is not domineering, stiff, or cold.

Don (man in his 40s): Charming and smart, but lazy. Instead of being an intellectual, he has become a school administrator, which allows him to coast without too much responsibility. With the reappearance of Catherine, he finds himself revitalized, re-engaged mentally like he was when he was a student. The grass is greener for him, too, when he sees another path he could have taken. Don is not sleazy, dopey, or hen-pecked.

Alice (woman in her 70s): Catherine’s mother, and almost accidentally becomes a student of her daughter’s feminist theory class. Her contributions are important, giving a generational context that would be missing otherwise. She speaks with feeling about a time when girls who didn’t have dates were unable to go to parties. Alice is well-spoken and intelligent, but very intentionally from a different era.

Avery (woman, 21): Avery was a better student a year or two ago before, in the words of the script, “She discovered booze and boys. She and her boyfriend (we’re exclusively hooking up, not hooking up exclusively) are trying to create a reality TV show to reflect how they feel about the world. Consider Avery the opposite of Alice. She is also of a particular era (the most recent one), but is still sharp and well-spoken.

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